Nuclearisation of Africa - Conference in pictures

The Gauteng Environmental Sustainability Report is attached for download.

An extract from the report states that "The Gauteng Department of Agriculture and Rural Development has a constitutional mandate of ensuring that Gauteng citizens are living in an environment that is not harmful to their health and wellbeing. With the Gauteng population estimated at 14,7 million, there is an increased demand for natural resources every year. If this trend persists, the province will find itself with unsustainable consumption patterns that may lead to malfunctioning ecosystems that are unable to provide services to the people."

National Planning Commission Releases the National Water Security Framework

 

In September 2015 the President announced the appointment of the second National Planning Commission (NPC). This second NPC was appointed to, amongst others, promote, advance and monitor the implementation of the National Development Plan (NDP) 2030 by government and across all sectors of South African society. The NPC conducts regular engagements with key stakeholders and wider society on all matters pertaining to the long-term development of the country.

As part of the ongoing work of the NPC to consult and advise on the implementation of the NDP, the NPC has developed a draft National Water Security Framework (NWSF) as means of ensuring a water secure country and as a response to South Africa’s water challenges.

 

About the Discussion on the National Water Security Framework:

 

In the current decade, water crises have been identified as being among the top global risks in terms of their adverse societal and economic impacts. In South Africa, given the unfavourable hydro-climatic conditions, apartheid vestiges, and national developmental imperatives, a water crisis would have undesirable consequences – particularly for the poorer sections of the population. In pursuit of a ‘virtuous cycle of growth and development’ as espoused in the National Development Plan Vision 2030, water security has been identified amongst the key pillars. It is within this context, that the NPC was mandated to lead a process of developing and finalising the National Water Security Framework on behalf of the NPC in the context of the NDP 2030.

The draft National Water Security Framework has been approved by NPC for public input and further stakeholder engagement. The aim of the National Water Security Framework is to develop a comprehensive framework that will provide a set of concepts, approaches and commitments that the country can use to safeguard the security of availability, access and supply for basic human needs while acknowledging the importance of other water uses. Follow the link to access the paper: National Water Security Framework or find it attached at the bottom of this article for download.

We encourage organisations/individuals to share the paper with colleagues and any other relevant organisations in their networks.

Stakeholder consultation process has now commenced across the country to solicit inputs towards the finalisation of the framework. Interested organisations and individuals are invited to attend. The stakeholder consultation dates are as follows:

  • 07 August 2019, Port Elizabeth, Nelson Mandela Municipality City Hall, Vuyisile Mini Square (Govan Mbeki Street)
  • 12 August 2019, Northern Cape, Venue to be confirmed
  • 19 August 2019, Western Cape, Venue to be confirmed
  • 30 August 2019, Gauteng, Venue to be confirmed

 

Written submissions,  can be send to the NPC by writing to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. by 30 August 2019.

Issued by: The National Planning Commission

Monday, 29 July 2019 16:29

Report for June/July 2019

The full report covering the June/July activity is attached for download.

The Federation for a Sustainable Environment (FSE),  have attended the Minister of Human Settlement, Water and Sanitation’s Budget Vote and the Stakeholder Engagement on the 16th of July, 2019. 

 

The Stakeholder Engagement included presentations by the CEO’s of the two established CMA’s (which were referred to as “Water Boards”); the Strategic Water Partners Network (SWPN)*; National Business Initiative; the World Bank and WISA. Regrettably, other stakeholders such as NGOs were not given the opportunity to engage.

*(The Partners in the SWPN are the South African Ministry of Water and Sanitation, World Bank, IFC, WEF, SAB, Coca Cola, Anglo American, Sasol, Nestle, Eskom, South 32, Exxaro, SASA, Distell and Coca Cola Bottling Association.)


Allow me please to briefly report on the Minister’s Budget presentation.  Please click here for the full report.

 

From a non-political and non-racial NGO’s perspective, it was hoped that the Minister’s and the opposition parties’ presentations would have transcended political and racial barriers.  Regrettably, it did not.

 

The Minister acknowledged inter alia:

  • The financial crisis/financial mismanagement (“huge financial problems”)
  • The irregular expenditure
  • The inequality in the distribution of water
  • Lack of capacity (limited technical staff) particularly in the municipalities (the compulsory training of municipalities)
  • The disproportionate percentage of water used for agriculture (61%) with 95% of water in the hands of white people
  • The aging infrastructure without the necessary skills and support at the right time or the right place to manage our problems on time
  • Vandalism and theft of infrastructure
  • Non-payment for services
  • The lack of skills which necessitated the appointment and monies spent on over-priced consultants
  • Effluent in rivers
  • Challenges with coordination between the three tiers for the provision of water
  • Non-compliance by the mining industry with its water license conditions

 

The proposed interventions are inter alia

  • To engage Treasury on the significant budget shortfalls of more than R2 billion affecting key projects such as the Emfuleni intervention project and Mzimvubu Water Project.
  • The Departments of Finance, Human Settlements, Water and Sanitation must put measures in place to top slice the municipal grants to service the debt owed to the Department and its entities before the grants are paid to Municipalities.
  • Municipal employees must be required, as is the case with other public servants, to undergo compulsory training so that they are equipped to manage our resources.
  • Review of the tendering process.​We will review our tendering process.
  • Revival of the DWS’ construction unit who will, together with members of the construction industry, establish maintenance task teams and attend to much needed maintenance intervention, especially in the water treatment and recycling stock.
  • Request to Cabinet to declare all major dams national key points.
  • An intensive campaign to digitise all its stock holdings, data and documentation. part of protecting resources and preventing damage and neglect. 
  • New regulations on the conservation of water.
  • Appointment of river, dams and sewerage inspectors from 1 August 2019.

 

There was, according to the FSE’s recollection,  no reference to:

  1. The long term management of acid mine water (the fact that AMD will continue to be produced long after the closure of gold and coal mines and the fact that continuous pumping of underground mine water is a pre-requisite);
  2. The establishment of the 7 non-operational CMAs; and
  3. The compliance status by the DWS of the directives by the South African Human Rights Commission inter alia:

 

  • The DRDLR (together with the DWS) are directed to take steps to translate existing guidelines regarding the provision of water on privately owned land into policy to ensure that basic protections in law regarding access to water are capable of being evaluated and enforced.
  • The DMR (together with the DEA and the DWS) must, respectively, include in their annual reports the number of compliance notices or other sanctions imposed, including the proportion of successful interventions and or criminal prosecutions undertaken against non-compliance.
  • The DEA (together with the DWS) are directed to take definite steps to ensure legal protection of our water source areas through, inter alia, the use of section 24(2A) of NEMA the inclusion of a specific provision that provides that the Minister of Water and Sanitation has the power to restrict or prohibit the grant of water use licences in water sources areas alongside the use of a host of legal tools, including section 26(g) of the Regulations of the National Water Act, section 49 of the MPRDA, management tools in terms of Conservation of Agricultural Resources Act, 43 of 1983 (CARA) and SPLUMA, Environmental Management Frameworks, and any further tools available.  A further provision that should be applicable, includes declarations in terms of the National Environmental Management: Biodiversity Act, 10 of 2004, of water source areas as threatened ecosystems.
  • The DWS is directed to provide a report on the current state of water use monitoring.  The Report should include:
    • Mechanisms in place to conduct regular determination of the water reserve, including how the DWS accounts for anticipated migration and population growth, limitations or inadequacies in municipal-infrastructure as well as other potential impacts on the availability of water resources, such as drought;
    • An audit of all existing WULs to ensure they adequately protect the water reserve, including basic needs and ecological requirements;
    • Steps taken to monitor compliances with WULs and its impacts, particularly in mining areas; and
    • The impact mining has and will have on the water reserve and how this aligns with the National Strategic Plan for Water.

Background information document for coal, pseudocoal & torbornite mining right application, integrated water use license application and environmental authorisation, all portions (excluding portion 46, 74,& 90) of the farm Tenbosch 162 JU, all portions (excluding portion 01) of the farm Vyeboom 414 JU, all portions of the farm Turfbult 593 JU and all portions of the farm Tecklenburg's Ranch 548 JU, in the Magisterial district of Barberton, Mpumalanga Province. 

Document attached for download.

Attached is a document compiled by the FSE for the Environmental authorisation process for the Middlevlei mine, Randfontein. 

Thursday, 11 July 2019 16:43

SA Mining Articles

The following related articles are attached:

  • Environmental Compliance: Are government and industry doing enough?
  • Mynhuis sal Potch se drinkwater vernietig
  • Hair-raising uranium levels found

 

Thursday, 11 July 2019 10:08

Jozi Gold Official Trailer

Jozi Gold - a story of wealth, greed and poisonous mountains. Johannesburg has produced a third of all gold mined in history. Now the gold is running out, the mines are falling apart and toxic waste turns water into poison. Former Jehovah’s Witness Mariette Liefferink is on a mission to force the mine bosses to clean up.

Directors Fredrik Gertten and Sylvia Vollenhoven, based on an original story by Adam Welz.

Official trailer with English titles.

View here.

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